cloud approval

FedRAMP Accelerated cuts CSP approval time

The FedRAMP Accelerated process has cut the time needed for cloud services to receive authorization under the Federal Risk Authorization and Management Program.

The approval process, which originally required up to 24 months, has now been reduced to about four while maintaining the same rigor, FedRAMP Program Manager for Cybersecurity Claudio Belloli said at the Amazon Web Services Summit on June 14. 

Although the four-month authorizaton does not quite reach the three-month goal that was floated when FedRAMP Accelerated was unveiled last year, it is shorter than the estimated six months reported in May by the cybersecurity management and compliance firm Coalfire.

For cloud service providers to gain authorities to operate, there are two avenues: they can either deal directly with agencies or apply to the Joint Authorization Board, a team comprised of the CIOs from General Services Administration and the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security.

Because the JAB can only handle about 12-14 cases a year prioritized "based on demand," FedRAMP evangelist Ashley Mahan said that "it makes so much more sense" for most cloud service providers to work directly with a sponsoring agency, then undergo an expedited two-week final review from the FedRAMP program management office.

According to the May report, the cost of securing a FedRAMP authorization recently has averaged between $350,000 to $865,000. However, Mahan said the program office is currently "working on new material about what those updated costs are." She noted that the price tag will ultimately depend on "a number of factors," including the provider's knowledge of FedRAMP requirements and documentation procedures.

Although FedRAMP certification has been required for virtually all cloud services used in the federal government since June 2014, Mahan acknowledged that some agencies still ask to work outside the FedRAMP framework. The CoalFire report estimated that 60 percent of agencies do not yet participate in the program.

"It absolutely is very frustrating for me," Mahan said.

About the Author

Chase Gunter is a staff writer covering civilian agencies, workforce issues, health IT, open data and innovation.

Prior to joining FCW, Gunter reported for the C-Ville Weekly in Charlottesville, Va., and served as a college sports beat writer for the South Boston (Va.) News and Record. He started at FCW as an editorial fellow before joining the team full-time as a reporter.

Gunter is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where his emphases were English, history and media studies.

Click here for previous articles by Gunter, or connect with him on Twitter: @WChaseGunter

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